My soul is full of longing for the sea
Why do we love the sea? It is because it has some potent power to make us think things we like to think.”
- Robert Henri
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43186sallysnowglobe:

popthirdworld:

For those of you out of Australia, a shark attacked someone and so the government has called for a giant kill of sharks in the area. Maassive protests have been held on beaches across Australia to protest this slaughter.
This dude is Australian Navy Diver Paul de Gelder who 5 years ago lost his arm and leg to a massive bull shark in Sydney Harbour. He is speaking out against the mass slaughter of sharks around Western Australia. Paul de Gelder is a champ.

Couldn’t resist reblogging x

sallysnowglobe:

popthirdworld:

For those of you out of Australia, a shark attacked someone and so the government has called for a giant kill of sharks in the area. Maassive protests have been held on beaches across Australia to protest this slaughter.

This dude is Australian Navy Diver Paul de Gelder who 5 years ago lost his arm and leg to a massive bull shark in Sydney Harbour. He is speaking out against the mass slaughter of sharks around Western Australia.
Paul de Gelder is a champ.

Couldn’t resist reblogging x

(via devilshope)

1328

http://darling-taima.tumblr.com/post/94451477093/the-shark-blog-love-sharks-but-dislike

the-shark-blog:

Love sharks, but dislike Discovery’s Shark Week? Here’s some videos, shows, and documentaries you can watch instead:

  • National Geographic: Shark Superhighway [Netflix]
  • Sharks of the Mediterranean: A Vanishing Kingdom [Netflix]
  • Search for the Great Sharks: IMAX [

(via freedomforwhales)

696thelovelyseas:

golfo (11) by sea zoom on Flickr.
1248libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch
Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.
This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.
Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.
The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).
It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.
Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.
References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]
Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach
Locality: New South Wales, Australia

libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch

Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.

This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.

Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.

The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).

It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.

Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach

Locality: New South Wales, Australia

(via seacuties)

73193malformalady:


Abalone, is a common name for any of a group of small to very large edible sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae. Other common names are ear shells, sea ears, and muttonfish or muttonshells in Australia, ormer in Great Britain, perlemoen and venus’s-ears in South Africa, and pāua in New Zealand
Photo credit: Jessy Eykendorp

malformalady:

Abalone, is a common name for any of a group of small to very large edible sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae. Other common names are ear shells, sea ears, and muttonfish or muttonshells in Australia, ormer in Great Britain, perlemoen and venus’s-ears in South Africa, and pāua in New Zealand

Photo credit: Jessy Eykendorp

(via sadsara)

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